The Collective MacAvity
School Of Making Movies:


Using The Ultimate Focused Loudspeaker:
Making Any Movie, Any Time


Cassiel C. MacAvity




The compressed and quick intro.
---Demo movie clips.
Any movie, any way, any time.
Creating better and greater communication
Small, fast, and very large scale and flexible filmmaking
The advantages of virtual filmmaking
Using video game software to make movies without having to adapt or reprogram
Don't start small, start big
How can we do this?



    To whomever may run across this, greetings, and we of the Collective MacAvity would like to hear your reactions to the following proposal.


    How would you like to make any movie that comes to mind, to tell any story whatsoever, to do this anytime, a movie of any length, with any detail, and be able to do that for extremely little money?

    Here's the short intro version and then the rest of the paper continues . . . .;

A) When someone has a story or when someone's written a really good novel or a short story and it's a major success, when adapting to movie Leave The Story Alone. When someone's made a nice bowl of soup, don't piss in the soup. Don't add scenes. Don't add random characters. Don't screw with the ending because some other story needs to be mixed in, because it doesn't. Just make the movie, and everyone will cheer at the sheer originality.

B) Henry Ford did not invent the automobile. He did invent the Ford Motor Company, and did a really good job making a lot of cars. Roger Corman did not invent the movie. He did take the basic movie making techniques and proceed to crank out movie after movie, non stop and very quickly, and basically make a comfortable profit on every movie, or at least evidently nearly every movie.

C1) Movie making does not require a camera.
C2) Computer animated movies do not have to be from Pixar and Dreamworks.
C3) Video game software does not need to make a video game.

    Now: in all of this proposal to make movies in a better and inexpensive way, is a profit guaranteed? Oh Hell no---because audience response can never be guaranteed, and barely predicted. Is such uncertainty a reason to not bother? Again, Oh Hell No, because this method gives the ability to focus on getting stories told in movies, not having to make random pointless movie production deals.

    The ongoing focus is and will remain to fixate on video game software based computer animated narrative movies, and perhaps documentary movies, all made absolutely inexpensively, quickly, absolutely really well, and totally prolifically. When someone comes in and complains of the limitations of the particular form, Too bad. You're a storyteller dammit, exceed the form.

    On our part, when we want to write an essay, we start a word processor on a computer and start typing. With that in mind, the project we work on---in between everything else we do---has two parts: A) developing a "word processor" system of filmmaking---or at least the documentation for what steps to follow, with options---based on a video game engine and assorted other software packages, where we then B) crank out all the movies we can think of. We have some original project ideas, and we have an even larger set of story adaptations that we think would made really good movies. Increasing skill and refinement from all that filmmaking will then return back to A), and then back across to B), each reinforcing and adding to the other. Additionally, an integral part of A) will create C), having and maintaining such a level of documentation that anyone else can assimilate and make use of these methods which themselves will have ongoing active demonstration and development as we continue with A) and B).

    And at the moment, for the demo part of the short explanation version, drop to the bottom of this page for a collection of video files currently being used for showing off what people have done in gaming visual execution---and what these files show is not even theoretical development, these video clips show what people are doing currently that demonstrates video execution capability . . . and currently all that we're seeing done with this software and these possibilities is little more than See me play with special effects and See me playing a game, where what can also be done is to make any movie that comes to mind, to tell any story whatsoever, to do this anytime, a movie of any length, with any detail, and be able to do that for extremely little money.

---Click here to go to assorted demo movie clips.


Sound interesting? Just think: Any movie, any way, any time.

    How would you like to make any movie that comes to mind, anytime, of any length, with any detail?

    For years, that's been rather difficult. What if you don't have or want to spend millions of dollars just on one movie alone? What if you don't want to spend an entire life on just one movie?

    Yes there have been super 8 cameras, then the assorted video cameras, and lately full motion digital recording is turning up everywhere.

    But what if you want more than just stupid skateboard tricks on Youtube?

    What if you want the ultimate bully pulpit, the way to present any idea, with any subtlety, setting and resetting however you want or need, and doing all that with relative ease, doing far more than the average Hollywood production, for a fraction of the effort and also a fraction of the cost?

    How would you like to have and use a truly large scale and completely focused personal loudspeaker?     What if you want to take any idea and play with it, show kids playing in your neighborhood, mix vaudeville with the Vietnam War, recreate San Francisco's Japantown as it was in the 1960s and 1970s, explore British economics, have an elephant slip on a banana peel, stage the ultimate murder mystery dinner, get a movie viewer to have . . .

    . . . Touched him. Saw her. Towers of death and silence. Angels of fire and ice. Saw Alexander. . . covered with honey and beeswax in his tomb. Felt the flowers growing over me. Oh, a man must have vision. How else could an English judge, and peer of the realm . . . take moonlit trips to Marrakesh and Ponders End? See six vestal virgins smoking cigars? Moses in bedroom slippers? Naked bosoms floating past Formosa?
---Peter Barnes, The Ruling Class

    First off, there are two very simple questions for anyone whosoever to answer.

    One; Can you drive a car safely and reliably through standard traffic conditions without crashing it?

    Two; Can you reliably handle your own finances over time without going bankrupt?

    If the answers are Yes and Yes, then Yes you can learn to make a movie with video game software---because you don't have to make the software, the software already exists, where there can be some slight tweaking here and there, but that slight tweaking can be like coordinating a complicated budget or dealing with rush hour traffic during a massive thunderstorm, every once in awhile.

    As well, have you also noticed that "Hollywood" movies are very, very, very, expensive? Have you noticed that there must be something wrong with that budgeting?

    For a very, very fast overview of possible cost---mainly from dropping terms into Google---, consider the following, but also consider that this paper---and this general outline cost---is not the cost of merely one movie. This is the combined cost of as many movies that you, or you and a team, can make in as short a time as you wish to make those movies.

    A middle to high end gaming quality computer: $4,000

    Private small audio recording studio: $3,000---This being again, a very, very fast overview, but actually probably high priced estimate.

    Gaming Software: $0 to ~$1,500, and even just a share of profits from a successful project.

    3D modelling software: $0 to $4,000

    Film production and editing software: ~$50 to ~$2,000

    Altogether, very roughly, for $7,000 to $14,000 one can have and operate an entire film production system, and use that system to make many movies rather than just one movie. Now the nasty bit of reality, such as it is: You and anyone you work with still have to eat and have somewhere to live and where is that computer going to be located, so the reality of this system is that the biggest ongoing cost is going to be paying you and other individuals and paying the entertainment lawyer. The next biggest required item becomes the movie script to make this movie, and having one, and we of the Collective foresee no problem coming up with several hundred scripts . . . .

    Now, for a result, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKX0xbbfdOs and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqPpe6Sb-WI

    These are a pair of short movies made by manipulating video game creation software.

    Next, see http://www.muvizu.com/ . . . .

Muvizu is free 3D animation software
It's easy to use but sophisticated and powerful
Make 3D animated movies in hours, not months
It's free for non-commercial and educational use
Muvizu means animation is for everyone


    The guy who made those two short movies above, is http://www.muvizu.com/Profile/jonbez/Latest/ . . . notice how much work he's done . . .

    See http://download.cnet.com/Muvizu-3D/3640-2186_4-75222355.html and http://vimeo.com/17250396 for reviews of Muvizu.

    Well, motion is very nice, but what about a more usual variety of people talking even more? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3miKTZLqQA0 and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2j2ptjyri4 were done with Valve's Source Filmmaker and are examples of synching movement to dialogue.

    In addition, and done much more recently, see

    Cryengine

    Unreal Development Kit

    Unity3D

    Valve Source and Source Filmmaker

    Google for "Game Engine Images"

    Next, to see what we describe as 100,000 bricks dancing like sprays of water, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3a6QxTt1isY and watch. After that, go play with any of the video clips to the right, where basically this is what the video game engineering results look like. Again, Never Mind How this is done, rather, look at the visual quality.

    Speaking of sprays of water, have a look at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbFVAkJaQfk and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MKhm4mx8I8

    Of more recent work, done using Unreal Engine 4, see http://www.vg247.com/2014/08/20/unreal-engine-4-udk-pc/ and note that all that work was done in only four hours. See http://www.slashgear.com/watch-this-unreal-engine-4-rendering-look-entirely-lifelike-19341835/ and note that it was done with an April 2012 vintage computer processor, and a video card that also is a bit old . . . .

    Also have a look at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vD3hPyYfrnE and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWvgETOo5ek

    Especially with the last two, is there a catch? Yes, the last time we checked, the Cryengine requires that Crytek have full access, and thus control over all projects . . . but then there are the other gaming software engines that are available under less constrained circumstances.---As a particular note, we of the Collective MacAvity are focusing on the Unreal Development Kit at http://www.unrealengine.com/udk/, because it has a good track record, allows all sorts of individual item control, and the overall software is a single item that can be downloaded and installed locally at will.

Creating better and greater communication

    The issue is communication and making that happen, and we of the Collective MacAvity are working on this, incrementally, and do rather look forward to doing all of the above ourselves. We might even do a staging of Peter Barnes' The Ruling Class, which was quoted above. But then again Peter O'Toole did rather do the definitive version didn't he.

    An answer we propose to this communications issue uses current and developing video game technology, the internet, and low cost DVD and other production channels to allow a small team, or several teams, with a really big message, to make a lot of varied movies rather quickly and for a long time.

    We currently work on this answer on our own and will develop it in enough time because we will consist of one of those teams, or at least the core of one, and we will crank out a variety of movies. To decrease that development time, getting support and assistance as needed will let us do more sooner as we continue this research and start bringing out completed projects.

    When considering using filmmaking as a method of communication, arguably a biggest communication megaphone in American society in the early 21st century consists of Hollywood and the Hollywood based show business in general. At the same time though, the Hollywood and Hollywood based show business system also has an equally major problem of complexity, slow reaction time, and too many cooks able to piss in the soup.

Small, fast, and very large scale and flexible filmmaking

    So: there are three axioms that make this concept plausible. These have no set order or importance, all three are equally linked and ranked.

A) When someone's made a nice bowl of soup, don't piss in the soup. When someone's written a really good novel or a short story and it's a major success, when adapting to movie Leave The Story Alone. Don't add scenes. Don't add random characters. Don't screw with the ending because some other story needs to be mixed in, because it doesn't. Just make the movie, and everyone will cheer at the sheer originality.

B) Henry Ford did not invent the automobile. He did invent the Ford Motor Company, and did a really good job making a lot of cars. Roger Corman did not invent the movie. He did take the basic movie making techniques and proceed to crank out movie after movie, non stop and very quickly, and basically make a comfortable profit on every movie, or at least evidently nearly every movie.

C1) Movie making does not require a camera.
C2) Computer animated movies do not have to be from Pixar and Dreamworks.
C3) Video game software does not need to make a video game.

The advantages of virtual filmmaking

    How much time, effort, and money would be required to make a feature movie for each play by William Shakespeare? 38 plays, 38 casts, all the costuming, all the sets, all the support crew, the lighting, the makeup, the cameras, the rehearsals. Now, imagine doing all that with almost as much ease as writing about it. Imagine using a computer to build a 3D image and model of the inside of a box. There's your set. Imagine using a computer to build a 3D head, body, arms and legs, and give them motion and speech. There's your actor, in full costume, with dialogue. Imagine using the computer to record what that actor does and says on that set. There's your movie.

    Next, repeat that 37 more times. There's the 38 movies of the complete plays of Shakespeare.

    To contrast two extremes, the building of a video game requires mapping out and assembling all the features and actions of all the possible occurrences that may turn up in that video game. Such a production does indeed involve a lot of animators, writers, artists, programmers, actors, all the company infrastructure to support all that, and so forth for many pages. On an other hand, when the sole interest in the video game engine becomes making a movie, the focus absolutely narrows and the complexity and required time absolutely drops. Only the basic virtual set to film a scene becomes needed, with the basic operational features to create and record that scene, and then one or one's team moves on.

    For another contrast of extremes, when making a conventional movie, the issues include the creation and care and maintenance of costumes, lighting rentals, camera rentals, insurance, negotiating with assorted civic authorities, the logistics of all that crew and cast, and enough other features to get an entire college degree on the subject. When creating a movie using video game software, one needs the gaming software, a game quality computer to build with, software for outside additions, sound engineering, editing and distribution production which can occur on the same computer, a script, the money to pay and house the filmmaker, and finally time just sitting and working. Of time required, to cite just one issue of conventional filmmaking, one looses none of the time that the conventional variety uses up waiting for rain to either start or stop.

    Compared to either of those, the lack of cost and complexity in video game based movie making has already been covered.

    Now also have a look at http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/hollywood-producers-death-254263

    Among other things: Evidence of the pressure studios are imposing on big-name producers is everywhere. Jerry Bruckheimer just underwent what he described to THR as the most difficult negotiation of his career with Disney to launch The Lone Ranger with Johnny Depp. Ron Howard and Brian Grazer of Imagine have seen their rich deal at Universal cut back and the studio pull the plug on their ambitious fantasy Western The Dark Tower, based on a series of books by Stephen King. A-list producers Frank Marshall and Kathleen Kennedy just departed from Sony after two years without a green light. Even the industry's ultimate 800-pound gorilla, Steven Spielberg, has had struggles raising money.

    ---The Lone Ranger, by the way, is supposed to have a budget somewhere over $200,000,000, which is indeed two hundred million dollars.

    Now: in all of this proposal to make movies in a better and inexpensive way, is a profit guaranteed? Oh Hell no---because audience response can never be guaranteed, and barely predicted. Is such uncertainty a reason to not bother? Again, Oh Hell No, because this method gives the ability to focus on getting stories told in movies, not having to make random pointless movie production deals.

    We will make movies, or particularly, tell stories while making pretty pictures, or not so pretty pictures, and will do such using this method. On our part, we finally noticed that video game image and movement quality have increased to such a level that most current games effectively became movies themselves. We don't play video games, from general lack of interest, but some people we have worked with do. When we asked them for suggestions, we got very emphatically pointed at a game series called Unreal Tournament and the software built into it.

    Since that time, we have run across other video game engines of which there are indeed one or two at the moment.

    The ongoing focus is and will remain to fixate on video game software based computer animated narrative movies, and perhaps documentary movies, all made absolutely inexpensively, quickly, absolutely really well, and totally prolifically. When someone comes in and complains of the limitations of the particular form, Too bad. You're a storyteller dammit, exceed the form.

    This proposed solution actively develops and maintains a filmmaking and distribution system which begins and remains fast, flexible, and relatively cheap, one that has ongoing innovation built in as a feature, one designed to hand to absolutely anyone to use, one that then gets used to crank out movie after movie after movie. At that point, the question of communicating a message gets reduced to developing the material to pump through this production engine.

Using video game software to make movies without having to adapt or reprogram

    Of course, one response to such use of video game software for making movies is "But this looks like a bunch of video game characters!!" The easy two part answer to this objection gives the overall answer: "Think puppet theatre." The two parts that make up this answer consist of writing and of visual quality. Of writing, as always the most important issue, when you have no story, you have no movie. Tell the story well, and no one cares how the movie got made. Of visual quality, absolutely anything using the game engine can get made and seen, where we've already noted that anything not built into the standard software can get created externally and imported.

    Therefore, what is needed at this point is to select what software to use, and, remembering the driving and banking example, what software to learn to use.

    As a note, we in the Collective have settled upon UDK, the Unreal Development Kit http://www.unrealengine.com/udk/

    Noting that many game engines are very adaptable, consider Unreal Engine, Unity, CryEngine, and Source:

    Unreal Engine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unreal_Engine ;

    "The Unreal Engine is a game engine developed by Epic Games. First illustrated in the 1998 first-person shooter game Unreal, it has been the basis of many games since, including Unreal Tournament, Deus Ex, Turok, Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3: Raven Shield, Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas, America's Army, Red Steel, Gears of War, BioShock, BioShock 2, Tactical Ops: Assault on Terror, Borderlands, Mirror's Edge, Batman: Arkham Asylum, Section 8, and so forth. Although primarily developed for first-person shooters, it has been successfully used in a variety of genres, including stealth (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell), MMORPG---Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game--- (Vanguard: Saga of Heroes) as well as RPGs---Role Playing Games---with Mass Effect, The Last Remnant, and Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone."

    The features of the video game engine tend to include an internal camera system that allows for recording of action occurring in whatever sequence of events a filmmaker or game creator assembles. Such assembled sequences can become any movie that anyone can think up, in any detail, where any detail not included already can get created externally by the filmmaker or game maker and easily imported into the game software. These movies, once created, do not need the game to be played, the game software becomes a filmmaking creation engine of movies. The output or recording of the video files will vary from game engine to game engine, but once those files exist and are edited as needed, a filmmaker releases and distributes this new movie just like any other movie. These movies can range from crowds to individuals, at any time in history or fantasy, with motion control built in to allow bodies and objects to move, turn, and tumble in completely realistic detail. Realistic lighting, preset motions, and importing of prerecorded sound files allow anything from the shuffling of cards in a dim casino through a daylight full assault in WWI Belleau Wood . . .

    Unity
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unity_%28game_engine%29

    "Unity is an integrated authoring tool for creating 3D video games or other interactive content such as architectural visualizations or real-time 3D animations. Unity's development environment runs on Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X, and the games it produces can be run on Windows, Mac, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii, iPad, iPhone, as well as the Android platform. It can also produce browser games that use the Unity web player plugin, supported on Mac and Windows but not Linux. The web player is also used for deployment as Mac widgets. Unity also has the ability to export games to Adobe's Stage 3D functionality in Flash, but certain features that the web player supports are not useable due to limitations in Flash."

    "Unity consists of both an editor for developing/designing content and a game engine for executing the final product. Unity is similar to Director, Blender game engine, Virtools, Torque Game Builder, and Gamestudio, which also use an integrated graphical environment as the primary method of development."

    CryEngine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CryEngine

    "On March 1, 2010, a new tech demo of the engine was released for the i3D 2010 symposium, which demonstrates 'Cascaded Light Propagation Volumes for Real Time Indirect Illumination'.[9] On June 11, 2011, the Australian Defence Force revealed that Navy personnel would train on a virtual landing helicopter dock ship made using the CryENGINE 3 software.[10] As of July 1, 2011, the Mod SDK version of CryENGINE 3 specifically to create custom maps, mods and content for Crysis 2 is available on Crytek's website. Crytek also released a free-to-use version of the CryENGINE for non-commercial game development. It was released as of August 17, 2011 under the name CryENGINE 3 SDK."

    Source
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Source_%28game_engine%29

    Source is a 3D game engine developed by Valve Corporation. It debuted in June 2004 with Counter-Strike: Source and shortly thereafter Half-Life 2, and has been in active development ever since. Unusual for a game engine, Source has been designed to receive constant incremental updates and does not have a meaningful version numbering scheme.

    Source was created to power first-person shooters, but has also been used professionally to create role-playing, side-scroller, puzzle, MMORPG, top-down shooter and real-time strategy games.

    The "Source Filmmaker" is a video capture and editing application that works from inside Source. The tool was used to create Team Fortress 2's "Meet the Team" videos, Left 4 Dead's introduction videos, and the Half-Life 2 Episode One and Two trailers. It allows users to place each character many times over in the same scene, creating the illusion of many participants, as well as supporting a wide range of cinematographic effects and techniques such as motion blur, Tyndall effects, Dynamic Lighting, and depth of field. (Motion blur has been added to the games themselves since the Orange Box version of the engine, though it was applied for camera movement only ? not per-object, like the filmmaker.) It also allows manual animation of bones and facial features, allowing the user to create movements that don't occur in-game, as in games, nearly all character animation sequences are stored in a set of different movements, and the amount of different animation sequences is limited. Valve promised to release the tool to the public upon the completion of the Team Fortress 2 "Meet the Team" series. . . . .

    . . . On June 27, 2012, the same day as the final video, "Meet the Pyro", was released, the Source Filmmaker became available on a limited-basis through the Steam network. It has been in open beta as of July 11, 2012.

Don't start small, start big

    On our part, when we want to write an essay, we start a word processor on a computer and start typing. With that in mind, the project we work on---in between everything else we do---has two parts: A) developing a "word processor" system of filmmaking based on a video game engine and assorted other software packages, where we then B) crank out all the movies we can think of. We have some original project ideas, and we have an even larger set of story adaptations that we think would made really good movies. Increasing skill and refinement from all that filmmaking will then return back to A), and then back across to B), each reinforcing and adding to the other. Additionally, an integral part of A) will create C), having and maintaining such a level of documentation that anyone else can assimilate and make use of these methods which themselves will have ongoing active demonstration and development as we continue with A) and B).

    Of this process, our commentary so far exists at http://themacavity.com/ Yes, when you look at all the names on the site, our all time favorite film producer remains Irving Thalberg, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irving_Thalberg "While he was alive, he refused to allow his own name to appear in his films."---As Thalberg noted, the issue always remains to get the many movies made, not get stuck in just trying to make a single movie.

    Keeping A) and B) in mind, and to outline the scale of possible projects, one of our project ideas does call for a film for each play by Shakespeare. In turn, A) and C) will stay as major as B), so we really do need to have projects to test by mixing them in with everything else that comes to mind. Remember the conventional film vs virtual film advantages noted just above, especially for filming 38 plays in sequence while also making other movies---Our plan is to more or less interlace Shakespeare, followed by a mystery, followed by a comedy, followed by a drama, followed by a war movie, followed by Shakespeare, followed by, and so on---certainly variations will occur in the selection, but an ongoing and varying program will remain a primary intent. When we run out of Shakespeare, we'll swap something else in.

    For distribution at this point in time, one can advertise through YouTube and Google. DVD production requires relatively little cost. Given enough interest, not only can one do a conventional theatrical filmmaking release through a standard theatre chain, more and more such releases have shifted to digital, which again greatly cuts the up front cost---And in North America alone, there are already over 16,000 digital projection theatres.

    Once again, this system makes filmmaking so relatively easy that having a really good entertainment lawyer on retainer becomes one of the features.

How can we do this?

    On our part, to keep the bills paid, we work full time doing other stuff. Personal research and projects thus have to get scheduled in among everything else, and we also keep having to stop and sleep now and then. Some of the software needed gets very expensive, and the paid work does get swamped, so on one hand such software can get paid for in time, but also that research winds up getting done intermittently.

    James Cameron's Avatar cost somewhere in the range of $300 million for one single extensively computer animated movie. For the system outlined in this paper, even just a few hundred thousand could start an entire production system and fund it for rather a long time. Our ideal situation would get so much cash up front, and an entertainment lawyer on retainer, that we could disappear into a corner with notes and computer and crank out movies and not have to notice how bleak the economy and how to keep the bills paid. Considering a guaranteed audience for some projects---Shakespeare, to name just one---regardless of how bleak the economy, a series of well made but very inexpensive movies should manage a profit, so even an up front pile of cash could make money for an investor.

    Robert Rodriguez made El Mariachi with $7,000, as he tells in his book Rebel Without A Crew. On an other hand, Rodriguez followed up with Desperado for a budget of about $7 million and Once Upon A Time In Mexico for about $29 million. By contrast, this proposal goes even further by staying with the video game engine as the ongoing tool and thus keeping the costs, and efforts needed, at a much greater minimum.

    In turn, and completely independent of anyone's filmmaking, a video game engine company's R&D will continue to develop and upgrade to match greater and greater demand for greater and greater features and detail in video games---and this proposal expects to very easily piggyback upon those improvements to also create greater and greater subtlety for basically the same cost and return.

    And with investment and support, the A) creation of that production system will get done a lot sooner than otherwise, and B) a lot of movies can get cranked out, and C) several teams of filmmakers can go out and about to beat the drum, tell the stories, play with all the ideas . . . . . .

   

    We thank you for your time, and we look forward to hearing your reactions . . . .



    Demo movie clips

Demo of visual capabilities using Unreal Engine Four
First, two videos that note facial manipulation;
Nvidia Project Logan "Ira" Demo
Unreal Engine 4 - Dynamic Normal Maps using Facerobot Rig
And for all the other features . . .
Movement Animset Pro for UE4
Architecture Real-time - Unreal Engine 4
Unreal Engine 4 - Extreme Graphics Presentation - The Cave
Unreal Engine 4 - GT.TV Exclusive Development Walkthrough
Unreal Engine 4 -- Infiltrator GDC 2013 Demo
The Garden of Eden in Unreal Engine 4 - Darker Version
UE4 Ocean Water Shader
Unreal Engine 4 Temple Demo
Unreal Engine 4 | Photorealistic Rendering Demo | GTX 780 Ti
Unreal Engine 4 - Rivalry Tech Demo
Unreal Engine 4 Elemental Demo
Of these next three, http://www.slashgear.com/watch-this-unreal-engine-4-rendering-look-entirely-lifelike-19341835/ states that these were done with a four year old video card rather than needing some latest and greatest---and expensive.
A demonstration of rain on pavement: UE4 shader/fx test
A demonstration of trees and reflections on stone: UE4 Archviz / Lighting 3
A classroom with chairs: UE4 Archviz / Lighting

A couple of entire short narrative movies made using Unreal Engine 3:
The Box (Unreal Tournament 3 Machinima)
The Plan: Unreal Engine 3 Machinima
Also UE3, but included simply because it's just fun to watch 100,000 bricks dancing like sprays of water.
Epic Physics - UDK 100,000
Also for the fun of it, using Unreal Tournament 2004, Who's On First demonstrates being able to read lips in animation, even in software from several generations back.

Creating using Unreal Engine Four
Creating a quick Unreal Engine 4 Futuristic City scene
--A creator's note on the page states: Quick scene I put together in Unreal Engine 4. Scene took me a little over 3 hours from start to finish.
I did NOT create the actual art assets used in this video, they were created entirely by Epic Games.

Creating a quick Unreal Engine 4 desert scene
--Again, the creator's note on the page states: Quick scene I put together in Unreal Engine 4. Scene took me a little over 4 hours from start to finish.
I did NOT create the actual art assets used in this video, they were created entirely by Epic Games.

Creating a quick Unreal Engine 4 Cave Entrance Scene
Creator's note: Quick scene I put together in Unreal Engine 4. Scene took me a little less than 2 hours from start to finish.
I did NOT create the actual art assets used in this video, they were created entirely by Epic Games.

Creating a quick Unreal Engine 4 Lava Scene
Creating and Animating Character for Unreal Engine 4 - FAST PRESENTATION
Unreal Engine 4 Tutorial: Custom Character (english)
Introduction to Third Person Blueprint game - 4 - Intro to Persona
Creating a quick medieval themed level using Unreal Engine 4 (Part1)
Creating a quick Unreal Engine 4 snowy mountain scene
Unreal Engine 4 Materials 2 Creating a Basic Material
Introduction to UE4 Level Creation - 2 - Geometry Layout
Introduction to the UE4 Editor - 5 - Placing Objects in Your Level
Unreal Engine 4 - Tools Demonstration GDC 2014
Water Tutorial Unreal Engine 4
And, facial manipulation and development using Blender, that can be imported into UE
UE4 Blender Character creation & animation tutorial 1






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